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guide-endstops [2017/01/25 23:13]
arthur
guide-endstops [2020/05/15 13:43] (current)
arthur
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 ==  Endstops ==  Endstops
 +
 <​html><​a name='​endstops'></​a></​html>​ <​html><​a name='​endstops'></​a></​html>​
  
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 However, end-stops are not necessary, you could do without them. They are just so convenient that most machines use them. However, end-stops are not necessary, you could do without them. They are just so convenient that most machines use them.
  
-End-stops can also be used as Limit Switches ​which prevent the machine from attempting to move beyond the physical limits of the axis (by pausing/​stopping movement when triggered), see the [[http://​smoothieware.org/​endstops|Endstops page]] for details about configuring Smoothie to use End Stops as limit switches.+End-stops can also be used as limit switches ​which prevent the machine from attempting to move beyond the physical limits of the axis (by pausing/​stopping movement when triggered), see the [[http://​smoothieware.org/​endstops|Endstops page]] for details about configuring Smoothie to use End Stops as limit switches.
  
-**NOTE** Smoothie does not allow you to use a zprobe as an endstop. An endstops must be dedicated to being an endstop and cannot be used as a zprobe and vice versa.+<callout type="​primary"​ icon="​true"​ title="​TL;​DR">​
  
 +To make things as simple as possible: In Smoothie, endstops do three things : 
 +
 +* Homing ( move til endstop is hit )
 +* Hard endstops ( stop when endstop is hit, which is optional )
 +* Soft endstop ( once homed, do not go further than a set position, which is also optional )
 +
 +</​callout>​
 +
 +<callout type="​warning"​ icon="​true"​ title="​ Note">​
 +
 +Smoothie does not allow you to use a zprobe as an endstop. An endstop must be dedicated to being an endstop and cannot be used as a zprobe and vice versa. This does not mean *ANY* kind of feature is missing, you can still do everything you expect, this is just a subtility in vocubulary and in how configuration is organized, that new users are generally fine with, *except* if they come from another system which has a different paradygm.
 +
 +</​callout>​
  
 <​html>​ <​html>​
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 You might happen have a good reason to use a fancy endstop, but if you don't, it's likely a good idea to stick with a mechanical one. You might happen have a good reason to use a fancy endstop, but if you don't, it's likely a good idea to stick with a mechanical one.
 +
 </​callout>​ </​callout>​
  
 ~~CLEARFIX~~ ~~CLEARFIX~~
  
-[http://​reprap.org/​wiki/​Mechanical_Endstop Mechanical end-stops] are simple interrupters : when not pressed, they do not let the current pass, when pressed, they let the current pass. By connecting a digital input pin on the Smoothieboard to the interrupter,​ and connecting the other side of the interrupter to Ground, the Smoothieboard can read whether or not it is connected to Ground, and therefore whether or not the end-stop is pressed.+[[http://​reprap.org/​wiki/​Mechanical_Endstop|Mechanical end-stops]] are simple interrupters : when not pressed, they do not let the current pass, when pressed, they let the current pass. By connecting a digital input pin on the Smoothieboard to the interrupter,​ and connecting the other side of the interrupter to Ground, the Smoothieboard can read whether or not it is connected to Ground, and therefore whether or not the end-stop is pressed.
  
 Most mechanical end-stops have 3 connection points, to which you have to attach your wires :  Most mechanical end-stops have 3 connection points, to which you have to attach your wires : 
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 </​html>​ </​html>​
  
 +~~CLEARFIX~~
 +
 +<callout type="​primary"​ icon="​true"​ title="​Normally Closed">​
  
-[[note]] 
 For each endstop, we connect C to Signal and NC to Ground because this means the digital input pin ( endstop connector ) will be connected to Ground in it's normal state and cut from Ground when the button is pressed. This approach is less prone to noise than the reverse. See [[http://​wot.lv/​combating-endstop-noise-on-a-reprap.html|here]] for more information. For each endstop, we connect C to Signal and NC to Ground because this means the digital input pin ( endstop connector ) will be connected to Ground in it's normal state and cut from Ground when the button is pressed. This approach is less prone to noise than the reverse. See [[http://​wot.lv/​combating-endstop-noise-on-a-reprap.html|here]] for more information.
 +
 Another positive effect of this approach is, that if a wire breaks for some reason you get the same signal as if the endstop is pressed. That makes sure that even with a damaged wire you are not able to overrun the endstop. Another positive effect of this approach is, that if a wire breaks for some reason you get the same signal as if the endstop is pressed. That makes sure that even with a damaged wire you are not able to overrun the endstop.
-[[/note]]+ 
 +</callout>
  
 Order is not important as polarity is not important here. Order is not important as polarity is not important here.
  
-<callout type="warning" icon="​true">​ +<callout type="danger" icon="​true" title="​Don'​t!">​ 
-Make absolutely sure that you do not connect VCC ( red ) and GND ( blue ) to a mechanical (microswitch) endstop! Depending on your wiring ​that may fries your smoothieboard instantly or when the switch gets pressed. There is wiring where this not happens and you switch the signal between VCC and GND, but if you're not careful enough you damage your board.+Make absolutely sure that you do not connect VCC ( red ) and GND ( blue ) to a mechanical (microswitch) endstop! Depending on your wiring ​this may fry your smoothieboard instantly or when the switch gets pressed. There is certain ​wiring where this won't happen when you switch the signal between VCC and GND, but if you're not careful enough you will damage your board.
 </​callout>​ </​callout>​
  
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 To know exactly what your endstop does, see it's documentation. To know exactly what your endstop does, see it's documentation.
  
-If once wired, your endstop reports the opposite of what it should via the <​kbd>​M119</​kbd>​ command ( <​kbd>​1</​kbd>​ when not triggered, and <​kbd>​0</​kbd>​ when triggered ), see the "​Testing"​ section.+If once wired, your endstop reports the opposite of what it should via the <​kbd>​M119</​kbd>​ command ( <​kbd>​1</​kbd>​ when triggered/pushed, and <​kbd>​0</​kbd>​ when not triggered ), see the "​Testing"​ section.
  
-Some endstops might require removing their "​pull-up"​ configuration,​ in this case, change : +Some endstops might require removing their "​pull-up"​ configuration,​ in this case, change :
  
 <​code>​ <​code>​
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 <​code>​ <​code>​
-alpha_min_endstop ​                           1.28^+alpha_min_endstop ​                           1.28
 </​code>​ </​code>​
  
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 </​code>​ </​code>​
  
-In some very rare cases, the endstop reading circuit on the [[Smoothieboard]] will not be adequate for your endstop type. In this case, you should use a "​free" ​GPIO pin ​on the Smoothieboard that nothing else uses to connect your endstop to.+In some very rare cases, the endstop reading circuit on the [[Smoothieboard]] will not be adequate for your endstop type. In this case, you should use a "​free" ​GPIO pin ​on the Smoothieboard that nothing else uses to connect your endstop to.
  
 See [[Pinout]] to find adequate pins. See [[Pinout]] to find adequate pins.
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-||~ Endstop ​||~ X MIN ||~ X MAX ||~ Y MIN ||~ Y MAX ||~ Z MIN ||~ Z MAX || +Endstop ​     ​^ ​X MIN     ^ X MAX     ^ Y MIN     ^ Y MAX    ​^ ​Z MIN     ^ Z MAX     ^ 
-||~ Config value || alpha_min ​|| alpha_max ​|| beta_min ​|| beta_max ​|| gamma_min ​|| gamma_max ​||  +Config value | alpha_min | alpha_max | beta_min ​ | beta_max | gamma_min | gamma_max |  
-||~ Pin name || 1.24 || 1.25 || 1.26 || 1.27 || 1.28 || 1.29 ||+Pin name     ​| 1.24      | 1.25      | 1.26      | 1.27     ​| 1.28      | 1.29      |
  
 More information can be found here. http://​smoothieware.org/​endstops More information can be found here. http://​smoothieware.org/​endstops
  
 ~~CLEARFIX~~ ~~CLEARFIX~~