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how-to-wire [2018/03/09 17:51]
97.82.117.84 [Crimping Connectors]
how-to-wire [2018/05/29 01:09] (current)
91.162.188.175 [Type]
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 = Introduction = Introduction
-The main goals of this guide is to provide basic electrical knowledge to beginners and to share some useful tips and ideas of how to achieve ​nice wiring for your machines.+The main goal of this guide is to provide basic electrical knowledge to beginners and to share some useful tips and ideas of how to achieve nice wiring for your machines.
  
-There are thousands of awesome builders around the world with top notch parts and genius concepts but when it come to wire it often comes down to hide everything behind some panels and place two zip ties.+There are thousands of awesome builders around the world with top notch parts and genius concepts but when it come to wiring, a common approch is to hide everything behind some panels and place two zip ties.
 While it will surely work, spending a few hours organizing and optimizing your wiring is a win-win. While it will surely work, spending a few hours organizing and optimizing your wiring is a win-win.
-Your machine will be safer, cleaner and even you won't need to hide everything anymore ;).+Your machine will be safer, cleaner and you won'​t ​even need to hide everything anymore ;).
 It can save you time later debugging problems or upgrading parts without rewiring them all the way. It can save you time later debugging problems or upgrading parts without rewiring them all the way.
  
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 <callout type="​warning"​ icon="​true"​ title="​ Notes "> <callout type="​warning"​ icon="​true"​ title="​ Notes ">
 Basic electricity is not a really difficult domain. Basic electricity is not a really difficult domain.
-It's dangerous if you don't know what you're doing and where is the danger.+It's dangerous if you don't know what you're doing and what can be dangerous.
 Remember that common sense is a great asset for not dying in the process. Remember that common sense is a great asset for not dying in the process.
 </​callout>​ </​callout>​
  
-First thing to mention is the fact that there is different electrical laws on different countries.+First thing to mention is the fact that there are different electrical laws in different countries.
 They can be very (too) strict to irrelevant (dangerous),​ different units or different colors. They can be very (too) strict to irrelevant (dangerous),​ different units or different colors.
-This guide try to be as global as possible but it can'​t ​be granted that everything apply in your country.+This guide tries to be as global as possible but don'​t ​take foe granted that everything ​will apply in your country.
 If you have any doubts, please refer to your local rules. If you have any doubts, please refer to your local rules.
  
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 **Solid-core** or **single-stranded** are cheaper to make, stay in shape when bent and can be used in screw terminals without using ferrules. However they will fail quickly if used on moving parts as stretching and compressing cooper too many times will break it. **Solid-core** or **single-stranded** are cheaper to make, stay in shape when bent and can be used in screw terminals without using ferrules. However they will fail quickly if used on moving parts as stretching and compressing cooper too many times will break it.
  
-**Stranded wire** are a bit more pricey but they are flexible and therefor ​more suitable for repetitive movements. However, they don't keep their shape as well as solid-core so you'll need a little more cable management to keep everything tidy. It's also a good idea to use ferrules on them when using screw terminals to keep all the tiny wires together.+**Stranded wire** are a bit more pricey but they are flexible and therefore ​more suitable for repetitive movements. However, they don't keep their shape as well as solid-core so you'll need a little more cable management to keep everything tidy. It's also a good idea to use ferrules on them when using screw terminals to keep all the tiny wires together.
 Make sure any wire you choose to use is actually copper, as the cheaper copper-clad-aluminum wires will break way more easily under stress and fail over time in most connectors. Make sure any wire you choose to use is actually copper, as the cheaper copper-clad-aluminum wires will break way more easily under stress and fail over time in most connectors.
 Another good alternative is silicone shielded wire, as used in electric RC cars. It's a good bit more expensive but is actually a perfect match for the job. Another good alternative is silicone shielded wire, as used in electric RC cars. It's a good bit more expensive but is actually a perfect match for the job.
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 <callout type="​success"​ icon="​true"​ title="​ Tips">​ <callout type="​success"​ icon="​true"​ title="​ Tips">​
  
-* Remove the really small screw to open the connector and try **not to loose it by replacing it on the black part** during your work inside+* Remove the really small screw to open the connector and try **not to lose it by replacing it on the black part** during your work inside
 * pin numbers are written on the inside and the outside of the black part so no front or back view questions. * pin numbers are written on the inside and the outside of the black part so no front or back view questions.
-* since it mount from the outside of the enclosure, make sure to pass your wires trough ​the hole **before soldering** (seems logical but...no, wait and see)+* since it mounts ​from the outside of the enclosure, make sure to pass your wires through ​the hole **before soldering** (seems logical but...no, wait and see)
  
 </​callout>​ </​callout>​
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 ~~CLEARFIX~~ ~~CLEARFIX~~
 <callout type="​success"​ icon="​true"​ title="​ Reminders and tips:">​ <callout type="​success"​ icon="​true"​ title="​ Reminders and tips:">​
-* Be carefull ​with the iron,by picking ​heated parts, etc it can seriously burn your hands (or something else, with a bit of talent) +* Be careful ​with the iron: touching ​heated parts can seriously burn your hands (or something else, with a bit of talent) 
-* Don't forget to unplug the iron when you have completed your job (very bad room heating) +* Don't forget to unplug the iron when you have completed your job (Very bad room heating...
-* Use only lead free solder, your lungs will thank you later. Some use a small fan to vent it away.+* Use only lead-free solder, your lungs will thank you later. ​ Some use a small fan to vent it away.
 * Clean your solder tip frequently * Clean your solder tip frequently
-* You will quite soon feel the need of a third or a forth arm when solderingbe creativeuse clamps, weight, ​wise, girlfriend, etc to help you.+* You will quite soon feel the need of a third or fourth ​arm when solderingbe creative ​and use clamps, weight, ​vise, girlfriend, etcto help you.
 * Really don't forget to unplug the damn thing. * Really don't forget to unplug the damn thing.
 +
 </​callout>​ </​callout>​